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Surgery for an Undescended TesticleTest­culo sin bajar: Cirug­a

Surgery for an Undescended Testicle

If the testicle doesn't descend on its own, it should be treated to prevent future problems. Surgery is done to bring an undescended testicle into the normal position within the scrotum.

Cutaway view of undescended testicle

Why Treatment Is Needed

  • The longer a testicle remains outside the scrotum, the more likely it is that it will produce fewer sperm.

  • An undescended testicle has a higher risk of cancer. This is true even after the testicle is brought down into the scrotum. Bringing the testicle down makes a problem easier to find.

  • An undescended testicle can leave a small tear (hernia) in the wall between the abdomen and the groin. The hernia needs to be treated to prevent future problems.

Surgery

The testicle is brought down into the scrotum during surgery.

  • You and your son are asked to arrive at the hospital or surgery center 1-2 hours before surgery.

  • Anesthesia is given to keep your son comfortable.

  • An opening (incision) is made in the groin or abdomen. Another small incision is made in the scrotum.

  • The testicle is detached from the tissue around it. Then it is brought down and stitched to the wall of the scrotum.

Call Your Doctor If:

  • The incision bleeds or becomes red, or there is a discharge from the incision.

  • A fever over 100.2°F

  • The child cries all the time.

After Surgery

Your son will most likely go home a few hours after surgery. He should be feeling better in 2-3 days.

  • The doctor may prescribe medication to relieve any pain your child has. Be sure to use it as directed.

  • The stitches will dissolve or be removed 7-10 days after surgery.

Publication Source: American Urological Health Association

Publication Source: University of Michigan Section of Pediatric Surgery

Online Source: American Urological Health Association

Online Source: University of Michigan Section of Pediatric Surgery

Date Last Reviewed: 2007-01-15T00:00:00-07:00

Date Last Modified: 2002-07-09T00:00:00-06:00

  

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Entire staff friendly and professional. Dr. Modder was patient and explained every step of the procedure. Results were explained. All my questions were answered. I felt comfortable that I was putting my health in good hands. - D.S

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